Tier Two District

Briarcliff Manor Union Free School District

MLA Works Cited How to Guide

MLA Works Cited How-ToPrint Resources

Books with 1 author
Author’s Last name, First name. Title of book. Place of publication: Name of Publisher, Year of copyright. Print.
Example:
Brooks, Victor. African Americans in the Civil War. Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers, 2000. Print.

Books with 2 or more authors
Author’s Last name, First name and Author’s first name last name. Title of book. Place of publication: Name of Publisher, Year of copyright. Print.
Example:
Naden, Corinne J. and Rose Blue. Chancellorsville to Appomattox : The Battles of 1863 to 1865. Austin: Raintree Steck-Vaughn, 2000. Print.
 

Books with an editor
Editor’s Last name, First name, ed. Title of book. Place of publication: Name of Publisher, Year of copyright. Print.
Example:
Haugen, David M., ed. Civil War: Primary Sources. San Diego: Lucent Books, 2002. Print. 

Article in a Encyclopedia
Author’s Last name, First name. “Article Title.” Title of Book. Edition. Print.
Example:
Boritt, Gabor S. “Abraham Lincoln.” World Book Encyclopedia. 2003 ed. Print.

Multivolume Work (using 1 volume)
Author or Editor’s Last name, First name, ed. Title of Book. Volume Number. City: Name of Publisher, Year of Copyright. Print.
Example:
Pilchak, Angela M., ed. Contemporary Musicians. Vol 28. New York: Thomson Gale, 2005. Print.

Multivolume Work (using 2 or more volumes)
Author or Editor’s Last name, First name. Title of Book. Total number of volumes. Place of Publication: Name of Publisher, Year of copyright. Print.
Example:
Pilchak, Angela M., ed. Contemporary Musicians. 49 vols. New York: Thomson Gale, 2005. Print. 

Newspaper
Indicate if it is the late edition, national edition, etc. If the page numbers are not continuous, put a + sign after the first page of article to indicate article followed on later pages.
Author’s Last name, First name. “Article Title.” Name of Newspaper Day Month Year, edition.: Section and Page numbers. Print.
Example:
Kener, Tyler. “Matsui’s Woes With the Mets Have Vanished Into Thin Air.” New York Times 21 Jun 2007, late ed.:D1+. Print.

Magazine Article
Author’s Last name, First name. “Title of Article.” Name of Magazine Day Month Year: Page numbers. Print.
Example:
Carmichael, Mary. “Medicine’s Next Level.” Newsweek 6 Dec 2004: 45-50. Print.

Scholarly Journal
A scholarly journal is written by academics for other academics. Its articles often go through a peer review process where experts review the article for accuracy and validity before they are published. Author’s Last name, First name. “Article Title.” Journal Name Volume number.Issue number Year of Publication: page numbers. Print.
Example:
Piper. Andrew, “Rethinking the Print Objective: Goethe and the Book of Everything.” PMLA 121.1 2006: 124-38. Print.

MLA Works Cited How-To Electronic Resources

Websites

Date of last update: use day month and year as available. If no date of last update is given, use n.d. Creator or author’s Last name, First name. “Title of Page.” Title of Site. Publisher or Sponsor of Site, Day Month Year of last update. Web. Day Month Year of access.
Example:
“Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1938.” American Memory. Library of Congress, 23 Mar 2001. Web. 28 June 2009.

General Format for Online Library Subscription Databases
If pagination is not given use n.pag.
Author’s Last name, First name. “Title of Article.” Name of Original Print Source Day Month Year: Page numbers. Name of Database. Web. Date of Access.
Example 1:
Zakaria, Fareed. “Greed is Good (To a Point).” Newsweek 22 June 2009: 40-45. Student Research Center. Web. 26 June 2009.
Example 2:
Urlacher, Brian. "U.S. Presidential Election, 1860." Encyclopedia of American Political Parties and Elections 2006: n.pag. Facts on File American History Online. Web. 25 Apr 2009.

Article in an Online Newspaper (not from a subscription database)
If no publisher is listed, use N.p.
Author’s Last name, First name. “Title of article.” Title of Newspaper. Name of Publisher, Day Month Year of publication. Web. Date of access.
Example 1:
Lubell, Sam. “Of the Sea and Air and Sky.” New York Times. New York Times, 26 Nov. 2008. Web. 28 Nov. 2008.
Example 2:
“Ambassador Visits Jailed U.S. Journalists in North Korea.” CNN.com. CNN, 23 June 2009. Web. 26 June 2009.
 
Article in an Online Periodical (not from a subscription database)
Author’s Last name, First name. “Title of Article.” Name of Magazine Name of Publisher, Day Month Year. Web. Date of Access.
Example:
Thompson, Ian. “5 Keys to the Draft.” SI.com Time Warner, 1 July 2008. Web. 26 June 2009.
 
Scholarly Article in an Online Magazine (not from a subscription database)
A scholarly journal is written by academics for other academics. Its articles often go through a peer review process where experts review the article for accuracy and validity before they are published.
If no page numbers are given use n. pag.
Author’s Last name, First name. “Article Title.” Journal Name Volume number.Issue Number Year of Publication: page numbers. Web. Day Month Year of Access.
Example:
Ouellette, Marc. “Theories, Memories, Bodies, and Artists.” Editorial. Reconstruction 7.4 2007: n. pag. Web. 5 June 2008.
 
Electronic Encyclopedia (Americana, Groliers, World Book, Encarta, etc.)
Author’s Last Name, First name. “Article Title.” Encyclopedia Name. Publishing Company, Year of Copyright. Web. Day Month Year of Access.
Example:
“de Kooning, Willem.” Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. Encyclopaedia Britannica, 2008. Web. 15 May 2009.


Formatting of Works Cited Page

An MLA Works Cited page is double spaced. The sources are in alphabetical order and each citation is a “hanging paragraph” that is, the first line sticks out further than the rest of the lines in the citation. There are no bullets or numbers for each entry and every entry ends with a period (.). Following is an example of an MLA Works Cited page.


 Works Cited


“Ambassador Visits Jailed U.S. Journalists in North Korea.” CNN.com. CNN, 23 June 2009. Web. 26 June 2009.
Boritt, Gabor S. “Abraham Lincoln.” World Book Encyclopedia. 2003 ed. Print.
“Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1938.” American Memory. Library of Congress, 23 Mar 2001. Web. 28 June 2009.
Brooks, Victor. African Americans in the Civil War. Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers, 2000. Print.
Carmichael, Mary. “Medicine’s Next Level.” Newsweek 6 Dec 2004: 45-50. Print.
“de Kooning, Willem.” Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. Encyclopaedia Britannica, 2008. Web. 15 May 2009.
Haugen, David M., ed. Civil War: Primary Sources. San Diego: Lucent Books, 2002. Print.
Kener, Tyler. “Matsui’s Woes With the Mets Have Vanished Into Thin Air.” New York Times 21 Jun 2007, late ed.:D1+. Print.
Ouellette, Marc. “Theories, Memories, Bodies, and Artists.” Editorial. Reconstruction 7.4 2007: n. pag. Web. 5 June 2008.
Pilchak, Angela M., ed. Contemporary Musicians. Vol 28. New York: Thomson Gale, 2005. Print.
Piper. Andrew, “Rethinking the Print Objective: Goethe and the Book of Everything.” PMLA 121.1 (2006): 124-38. Print.
Urlacher, Brian. "U.S. Presidential Election, 1860." Encyclopedia of American Political Parties and Elections 2006: n.pag Facts on File American History Online. Web. 25 Apr 2009.
Zakaria, Fareed. “Greed is Good (To a Point).” Newsweek 22 June 2009: 40-45. Student Research Center. Web. 26 June 2009.


MLA Page Formatting

MLA format does not require a formal Title Page. Your name and other information should be one inch from the top of the first page and flush with the left margin. Do not underline your title or put it in quotation marks or type it in capital letters. The information should be as follows:
Student’s Name
Teacher’s Name
Course Name
Day Month Year (5 July 2008)

Headers
A header with your name and the page number should be ½ inch from the top of the page.